Lunar Tetrad

The first Blood Moon eclipse in a series of four (lunar tetrad) happened during the night of April 14-15, 2014.
Blood Moon

Lunar Tetrad

Total lunar eclipses are rare, only about one in three lunar eclipses are total, and about four or five total eclipses can be seen at any place on Earth in a decade. Every once in a while, four total lunar eclipses happen in a row. This event is called a lunar tetrad. The total lunar eclipses happen six months apart and there are at least six full Moons between two total lunar eclipses in a tetrad.
The term “Blood Moon” is sometimes used to describe a total lunar eclipse, since the Earth casts its shadow on a full Moon and eclipses it and the Moon may get a red glow.

Blood Moon on Sept. 27 2015
Blood Moon on Sept. 27 2015

2014:
Total lunar eclipse: April 14-15
Total lunar eclipse: October 8

2015:
Total lunar eclipse: April 4
Total lunar eclipse: September 28

Blood Moons in Biblical prophecy

“And I will shew wonders in the heavens and in the earth, blood, and fire, and pillars of smoke.
The sun will be turned to darkness, and the moon to blood before the great and dreadful day of the LORD comes.” – Joel 2:30,31

bloodmoon1
The first Blood Moon eclipse in a series of four (lunar tetrad) happened during the night of April 14-15, 2014.

Spica

Spica is the brightest star in the constellation Virgo, and the 15th brightest star in the night sky. It is a blue giant and a variable star of the Beta Cephei type located 260 light years from Earth. Spica is a close binary star whose components orbit about each other every four days. They remain sufficiently close together that they cannot be resolved as individual stars through a telescope.

Blood Moon on Sept. 27 2015
Blood Moon on Sept. 27 2015